Friday, February 4, 2011

Way back when....





This is the panel that changed my life. See folks I grew up in the 1990's and this is the very first comic I ever read. It was Spider-Man #57 by Howard Mackie and John Romita Jr. I was a huge fan of the Spider-Man cartoon and once I found out they had a comic book boy was I stoked. I picked this book up from a newsstand in my hometown. Now that I think about it, I haven't seen a newsstand in years. My aunt was working there and I didn't have to pay for the comic which was pretty damn sweet.  Reading this I was confused. When did Spidey change his costume? What the hell is the clone saga. How'd Aunt May die? I spent a whole week reading and re-reading this issue. Hell the power went out in our house so I had to read it by candle light. This comic also made me fall in love with one Ben Reilly. Ben put a damn good fight trying to protect a pregnant Mary Jane from Judas Traveller. Lot's of action and a great issue where the hero has a really great build to show you just how much of an awesome character Ben could be. I'm gonna go back and re-read this and gush over Ben. Oh, and you should too.


By Tash Moore

4 comments:

  1. It's interesting how much JR jr.'s art style has changed over the years and how much it really hasn't. It's way more stylized and "blocky" now yet he still draws just about the same faces, as you can see in the panel above.

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  2. I haven't heard of comic book collectors in a very long time, I'll be following your blog!

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  3. Awesome! Glad to have you on board, CremeMagnolia.

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  4. JR Jr's art style evolved in a manner that is reminiscent of Jack Kirby's. As his career progressed, Kirby's character renderings also became more blocky and stylized. This allows the artist to put the emphasis on storytelling rather then detail and anatomy. Another benefit to that philosophy is an increased work rate. Kirby was famous for being able to render an average of four pages a day! At one point in JR jr's career, Kirby advised him to simply sit down and do the work. It's no wonder their art styles shared a similar path!

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